Entries Tagged 'Art' ↓

Do we need to change the Business Makeup of Downtown Sioux Falls to make it more tourist friendly?

I’ve been having a little fun on Facebook over this story about boutiques in DTSF. (Stormland TV deleted my FB comment, but it still remains on my FB page);

LOL. I Often joke with my fellow downtowners that I will soon be opening a women’s boutique DT that has clothing, cupcakes, craft beer bar and fudge shop. Yes, there are too many women’s boutiques DT. More bars and restaurants and entertainment options, your dress shops are wasting valuable space DT, go away.

To tell you the truth, I could care less how many women’s clothing stores are DT. But I also feel that the makeup of DT needs to be tweaked going forward. I like to use Fort Collins, CO as a great example of an amazing DT area. I have visited twice over the past 6 years. I love it. It is very comparable to Sioux Falls because of population and a midwestern feel. While the footprint is bigger, the parking situation, walkability and structures are very similar.

What makes their DT flourish, I believe, is the high concentration of eateries, art galleries and misc, interesting retail.

Fort Collins Downtown Business Members (Breakdown)

Restaurants, Bars, Delis, etc. – 61

Variety, Giftshops, Retail, Jewelry, etc. – 52

Art Galleries – Private & Non Profit – 22

Banks, Real Estate, Law, Insurance, etc. – 30

Medical Clinics, etc. – 13

Business Services, Spas, Etc. – 37

Clothing Stores – 13

Lodging – 2

Funeral Home – 1

Auto Repair and Dealerships – 3

Government related – 12

Churches – 2

(Not on the membership list is dozens of marijuana shops)

Besides the fact they are a brewery haven, have a large college and they have FREE pedicabs, they embrace what brings people DT, especially tourists; unique shops, great food and drink and art galleries. Do you know how many art galleries are DTSF? Approximately four, if you include 8th and Railroad. One of them is the Pavilion, which charges an admission even though it gets government subsidies. One of the stupidest things was for the Pavilion to start charging admission to the VAC.

DTSF needs to start researching and implementing the Ft. Collins model, or we can keep opening dress and cupcake shops.

First Friday Art

I will be showing (and selling) several pieces at this show. A portion goes toward the charity.

Is the ‘Arc of Dreams’ getting tweaked

Top image is the new and improved design, bottom is the original.

I guess I haven’t heard any announcements that the design of the sculpture was changing, in fact if you go to their website, they still have the old image up.

I caught it on the site sign yesterday next to the proposed location. It must have just recently changed because I ride my bike by this sign almost everyday.

What do you think of the new design compared to the old? I kind of liked the simplicity of the first design.

But the artist may not have a choice in the matter. When it was first proposed I was told by and engineer and a person who has worked around large scale public art projects that since the piece was flat and didn’t touch (held together) it would need massive counterweights because of the wind. I’m sure the new design helps with wind flow and is much lighter without the panels of polished stainless steel. I’m also wondering if it is a little cheaper to?

I’m curious if there will be an official announcement about the change, I also wonder if they will tell us why it had to be changed. Things that make you go hmmmmm. I guess sometimes your dreams have to be tweaked to come true 🙂

In case you missed the Headliner at JazzFest last night; MarchFourth

Poetry Club w/Charles Luden

POEM FROM NOTEBOOK 97

Had a dream about petunias

then they were cactus blossoms

Finally awoke after three days

inside the imaginary whale

Walked around a city block

greeting each hooded politician

Charles Luden • May 25, 2017

Art Maze II kicks Ass!

Click to Enlarge

You can still see it tonight, 6th and Phillips in JAM Art. It’s FREE!

Arts & Economic Prosperity Study (in Sioux Falls Area)

I have received a copy of the study, the FULL document is attached below.

Once you start to look at the study, it is obvious the National organization uses a boilerplate for the study, so a lot of the data in the study, or mostly the quotes are from that.

On page 3 they give our local data and economic impact, which is impressive; $105 million dollars.

Than some numbers get a little skewed. For instance on page 4 they say the average household income in SF is $71K, which is much higher than the National average of $23K. I’m wondering if this is the average income of those who were surveyed. Kind of confusing. Page 8 also has this disparity.

This disparity also shows up in ONE night of lodging on page 9. The average was about $10 a night. Not sure how this average comes about, but that seems very low, unless of course a family of five is spending the night in a campground. This gets cleared up on page 10 where the study says only about 17% of attendees spend the night in SF.

On page 11 it shows that a large percentage of residents who attend events are over 55 (56%) and have an income of over $80K a year (52%). Which isn’t such a bad thing because it is evenly spread between people younger than that and of lower incomes. The arts are truly enjoyed by everyone in our community.

The rest of the study explains how they come up with the results.

I think the study is a good start, but I would like to see a community wide study that also includes the Events Center and Convention Center (they are NOT non-profits).

FULL PDF Document: arts-econ-pros

A local economic impact study that actually shows us the numbers

Of course, it did NOT come from city hall. That would go against their fierce opposition to transparency.

Findings reveal the non-profit arts and culture industry generates $104.5 million in total economic activity in the Sioux Falls area, supports 3,567 full-time equivalent jobs, generates $71.1 million in household income to local residents and generates $2.8 million in revenue to local government.

The Study found that on top of admission costs to events, arts and culture audiences spend an additional $30.35 per person per event. This figure is up from $21.57 reported in a similar study released in 2012. The effect of these dollars is felt throughout the local economy: organizations pay employees, purchase supplies, contract for services, and acquire assets within the community while audiences spend money locally on meals, hotel rooms, and gas, among other things. The ripple effect of arts and culture spending in Sioux Falls amounts to $84.8 million annually.

Add to this the $20.8 million spent by arts and cultural nonprofits themselves, the result is $105.4 million in cumulative economic activity in Sioux Falls.

What I found interesting is that while the Pavilion participated, SMG (Events Center) and the Convention Center did NOT. You would think that if both or either one participated, these numbers would look very different. But like I said already, that would require letting the public look at the books.

I have requested a full copy of the study.

Poetry Club w/Charles Luden

Lawyers and doctors are always practicing their professions.

Do they ever perfect them?
Perhaps it’s like musicians always looking for the cool notes 
hoping to blow them hot 
in the small hours.
 
Charles Luden
6-15-17
at Dunn Bros Coffee.

Detroit Lewis DOC review; Tom Waits: Tales From A Cracked Jukebox

My favorite songwriter of all time.

Using rare archive, audio recordings and interviews viewers are taken on a trip through the surreal, moonlit world of Tom Waits – a portrait of one of modern music’s most enigmatic and influential artists.

Only three musicians make me cry almost instantly, Hank Sr., Lucinda Williams and Tom Waits. I have about 90% of his stuff, and some rare European live crap. I did an art exhibit a few years ago that were paintings based on his music. The only show I sold completely out of. If you are not a fan, I suggest you watch this DOC done by BBC, and learn a little about this fantastic artist.