Entries Tagged 'Documentary' ↓

Detroit Lewis DOC review; Burden

I think If I would ever aspire to be a great artist, I would want to be Chris Burden. I think his transformation from crazy performance art to amazing sculptor is fascinating.

Detroit Lewis DOC review; I Am Not Your Negro

This incredible film explores the TRUE relationship between whites and blacks in America and how we TRULY view each other;

In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, Remember This House. The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and successive assassinations of three of his close friends-Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only thirty completed pages of his manuscript. Now, in his incendiary new documentary, master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of these three leaders, Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for.

I think there is no better time to watch this documentary, no matter how you feel or think you feel about Black Americans.

Detroit Lewis DOC review; Citizen Jane: Battle for the City

Love the above quote.

Some in power in this great town think they are the ONLY one who gets to make the grand decisions, like when it comes to Indoor Pools or Administration buildings.

In this Documentary, Jane Jacobs takes citizen activism to her city, NY, on a large scale;

Citizen Jane is a timely tale of what can happen when engaged citizens fight the power for the sake of a better world. Arguably no one did more to shape our understanding of the modern American city than Jane Jacobs, the visionary activist and writer who fought to preserve urban communities in the face of destructive development projects. Director Matt Tyranuer (Valentino: The Last Emperor) vividly brings to life Jacobs’ 1960s showdown with ruthless construction kingpin Robert Moses over his plan to raze lower Manhattan to make way for a highway, a dramatic struggle over the very soul of the neighborhood.

Jane shows that you can make a difference on a local level, and take on the ‘big wigs’ and win.

Detroit Lewis DOC review; Traceroute

Besides the fact TRACEROUTE has won numerous indie doc awards and has gotten fantastic reviews, you don’t have to be a Nerd or into Nerd culture to enjoy this film, in fact it may get you to understand it more.

What makes TR great is that it is hilarious. Not rolling on the ground, crying, trying to catch your breath funny. But constantly laughing in your head because of the constant comedic comments by the director, producer, writer and and narrator Johannes Grenzfurthner.

“You can’t make fun of LA, it’s beyond parody, like Henry Kissinger receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.”

And while Johannes is covering a topic that has been covered a million times before, he brings originality to the film, by making fun of mundane documentaries, by filming this like a mundane documentary. (oh, and on a personal note, they stop at the Henry Miller museum in Big Sur, a place I have been).

You will either really like this DOC, or you will be cursing me for wasting 2 hours of your life. Oh well.

Traceroute is a 2016 Austrian/American documentary film directed by Johannes Grenzfurthner. The autobiographical documentary and road movie deals with the history, politics and impact of nerd culture. Grenzfurthner calls his film a “personal journey into the uncharted depths of nerd culture, a realm full of dangers, creatures and more or less precarious working conditions”,[1] an attempt to “chase the ghosts of nerddom’s past, present and future.”[2] The film was co-produced by art group monochrom and Reisenbauer Film. It features music by Kasson Crooker, Hans Nieswandt, and many others.

 

 

 

“For now . . .”

I have often been fascinated by Hugo Chavez and how he is his own’s worst enemy. So many great ideas, such poor judgement. He is clouded by power, not socialism. He reminds me of a combination of Castro and Pablo Picasso.

Frontline on PBS did an 90 minute doc on him that explains it all.

I like the uniforms though . . . red is such a powerful color.

Oyateunderground-Siyotanka: A Voice from Within

Wanbli WiWohkpe (James Starkey) has been making a series of videos. This is one of them. James makes and plays his own traditional flutes often out of found objects.

Commentary;

Wanbli WiWohkpe grew up on the streets of Rapid City, an illegal squatter town built in the Sacred Homeland of the Lakota Nation.
Growing up amidst what was commonly called “The Feud”, Wanbli WiWohkpe was caught between two worlds: the wasicu world of academia, where he excelled and blossomed, and the world of the reality around him, where he was looked down upon for who he and his Family were.
Wanbli WiWohkpe saw the utter disrespect afforded the Indigenous Male. He was told constantly in school to eschew his kin, and to grab hold of the American Dream.
Through a series of events, Wanbli WiWohkpe chose instead to follow his older brother, Warren Rich, and the two became very close, almost as if they melded into one person. He learned to be strong, to be swift, and to be loyal.
The Youths ultimately became entangled in the system of incarceration perpetuated by the Invader/Occupier. The Youths grew into Men, and the violence continued and escalated. Knowing something was amiss and unable to articulate what, these Men learned to lash out upon others of their kind. A tragic spiral of lateral violence continued unabated until they were all again incarcerated by the illegal squatter government.
Wanbli WiWohkpe went to prison for 1st Degree Manslaughter in 1986.
In the subsequent years, Wanbli WiWohkpe has seen those closest to him as a Youth perish. Most escaped their oppression via suicide. None lashed out at the Invader/Occupier in the terrible ways other oppressed Nations do. None went amongst the Invader and exploded. None took the Occupier with them to their death.
Instead, being from a beautiful People not familiar with domestication, a People not wishing to inflict damage upon their tormenters; not wishing anything from their tormenters but for the torment to cease, they imploded.
They imploded and they continue to implode. The Invasion/Occupation continues unchecked, and the Lakota Nation, especially the Lakota Male, remains pauperized.
Our Lives were stolen by the Occupier. Every thing the Invader has is stolen.
Every bite of food, every warm bed, every happy home, every scrap of power, every nuance of anything enjoyed by the Invader is taken directly from the Health of the Indigenous. The Invader’s prosperity is taken directly from the Hearth and Home of the Lakota Nation. A Hearth and Home now non-existent as the Lakota People wander their own Homeland as homeless.
As the fortunate give thanks for the blessings of God and their American Dream, the Lakota Nation, the less fortunate, continue to simply exist as pesky and useless vermin in the Occupier’s world.
Through Lakol Wicohan, the Friendly Lifeways of the Lakota Nation, Wanbli WiWohkpe began to see. He began to understand the difference between his Nation and the Occupier. He committed himself to Sundance and Vision Quest, and now after completing 4 years of Sundancing and a 4 day Vision Quest, Wanbli WiWohkpe has made a true Relative with the Siyotanka, the Ancient Lakota Flute.
Wanbli WiWohkpe believes the Siyotanka is part of Lakota Man Power, a component of our Being that has been kept from us. To label the Siyotanka as a “courting flute” and to play it as feebly as “Native American Flute” players do, keeps us emasculated as Indigenous Males.
Look around, most “Native American Flute” makers/players are not Indigenous, and those famed Indigenous flute players often play a non-Indigenously made flute.
The Invader/Occupier is literally chopping off a part of us, emasculating us; thereby rendering us impotent. Wanbli WiWohkpe has learned directly from the Winged and Four Legged just how to play the Siyotanka, how to regain Lakota Masculinity, and how to Heal.
OyateUnderground Productions: World Class Representin’.

Wanbli WiWohkpe, he emaciapelo

South DaCola DVD club; Henry Miller

If you are a fan of his writing, I highly suggest your pickup the above DVD, Henry and June. The movie is about the time he spent in Paris with wife June and his affair with Anis Nin. Another great DVD is one I picked up at his library in Big Sur, originally released in 1996 by PBS called, Henry Miller is Not Dead. It is a documentary of several interviews with him, in which he basically rants about life. It has a Grey Gardens feeling about it. He reminds me of Picasso in some of things he says and does and his feelings about art. Henry was actually an amazing painter to.

 

 

Incident at Oglala: The Leonard Peltier Story

South Dakota ANSWER Film Showing

(If you have not seen this – GO! It is an incredible DOC)

“Incident at Oglala”
Tuesday, November 25 – 6PM

Black Sheep Coffee House
1007 W. 11th St.
Join us for the discussion afterward.

In 1975, armed FBI agents illegally entered the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.  Gunfire erupted – a Native American and two FBI agents fell dead.

After the largest manhunt in FBI history, three men were apprehended – only one, Leonard Peltier, was convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison.  This is his story.
From the very beginning, Peltier’s case has been dogged with controversy.  Were the charges trumped up?  Was the evidence falsified?  Were witnesses pressured to change their testimony?  Many people, including some of today’s greatest legal minds, believe that Peltier is an innocent man.
Twelve years ago, Robert Redford visited Leonard Peltier in prison.  Today, after years of struggle with the FBI and the prison system, he and director Michael Apted are able to present Incident at Oglala – a riveting examination of the case and the real story of what may be one of the most outrageous abuses of justice in American history.

For more information:

www.SoDakAnswer.org

South DaCola Doc pick; Grey Gardens (1975)

One of my favorite doc’s of all time.

Think the pictures are whack? You should the real deal. IMDb’s review.

A remake is coming out soon.