Entries Tagged 'Medical Mary Jane' ↓

Recreational Marijuana Petition, What Happened?

The only POT that is legal in SD.

Only a few months ago, I was told that things with the REC petition were doing very good, even better than the medical petition.

Apparently that is NOT the case today.

Do I think I was lied to? Not at all. It seems what is evident today is that the circulators who promised to circulate didn’t follow through. Trust me it happens, I have seen it with local petition drives. That is why when I take a sheet, I don’t make any promises.

But what worries me more is that there seemed to be a bigger effort to get signatures for medical marijuana first (they did submit enough initially, but may not have enough to be certified). Let’s say that the medical petition is certified and does make the ballot, I still don’t give it much chance of passing.

Why is that?

As I have told the past two campaigns on this topic, people don’t want to fiddle around looking for a doctor to prescribe them medical marijuana, or hold a card, etc, etc. And recreational smokers don’t consider it fair either. People just want to go to the corner Jane store, pick up their weed and use it. Is it really anyone’s business if that is for pain, meditation and self-reflection or to simply just get high and check out for awhile?

Theirre efforts should have been full boar into getting rec on the ballot, it would have passed. Medical, I guess we will see.

Want to reduce opiod use? Marijuana.

A recent news report says that Sanford Health is researching alternatives to opiod pain relief and reducing there usage.

One word; Marijuana.

And I am not talking about the medical stuff they have to make syrup out of, I’m talking about good old natural THC. Either vape it or get it in an edible. It has been a natural pain reliever for thousands of years. And here’s why the medical community and big pharma doesn’t like it.

Unlike prescription drugs that are often made from dangerous highly addictive chemicals, Marijuana can be grown at home without a prescription from a doctor.

Obviously, it cannot be used for extreme pain but it can help with minor aches and pains, relieves spasms, increases appetite and can relieve minor stress and depression.

Like any drug overuse can cause problems, uh like, laziness and laughing a little too much. There is NO record of anyone dying from an overdose of Marijuana, but can cause anxiety in some people.

Why the medical community doesn’t study this natural drug more is beyond me.

There is a good chance that on Monday valid petitions will be turned in for Recreational Marijuana to be put on the ballot in 2018. I think it will pass with over 55% of the vote if it makes the ballot.

We not only need to embrace this like other states have for pain relief but the sale of recreational marijuana could change state funding like nothing before and has shown to reduce crime and criminal justice spending.

Enough goofing around with dangerous chemicals and skyrocketing crime, South Dakota needs to embrace the legalization of Marijuana.

 

A new wind (smell) may be blowing over South Dakota in 2018

There are many stories circulating about the initiatives and referendums ‘circulating’ the state, but one seems to be standing out. I am hearing that ‘recreational’ marijuana is doing very well.

I have also personally opined that if rec gets on the ballot, it will pass. I wouldn’t even be surprised if it gets as high as 56% of the vote.

Besides the fact that people who smoke or have no problem with people who smoke voting for the initiative, there are many who don’t want to go through a prescription process to get the pain relief they need from a natural occurring drug. So who else would vote for rec use? Educators would get a dedicated 40% in revenue from the sale of the product. That could easily infuse over $20 million in the first year. There is also all the savings in law enforcement and incarceration, which should make police and state’s attorneys across our state very happy.

The only argument recently gaining steam against legal rec is ‘drug’ driving. Guess what, drinking and driving will still kill more people each year than any other kind of drug use. That and whether or not you are legally smoking and purchasing marijuana or not, just like drinking and driving, making it a legal product doesn’t change whether people will drive while using it.

Of course our last hurdle will be if our state legislature and AG will let this legally be put on the ballot, and if it passes, let it become state law. Like IM 22, if they override this, it would quite possibly be one of the stupidest things they have ever done (I know, where do we begin on that list).

Unlike Marsy’s Law and IM 22, the legislature, the citizens, the business community, and law enforcement best get ready, legal rec marijuana could be a stark reality next Fall in SD, instead of meddling with it or f’ing up this opportunity, let’s embrace it.

Republican Leaders in SD continue to grasp at straws about the evil weed

Doesn’t matter how many FACTS you throw at Republican leaders in our state about the benefits of eliminating the prohibition of marijuana, they continue to grasp at any made up crap they can to call out on the evil weed.

Mayoral candidate and all around Shaggy double, David Zokaites did a presentation about drug prohibition and especially the worthless nature of prohibiting marijuana at public input during the Minnehaha county commission meeting this week AND the same presentation at the city council meeting.

At the end of the meeting during open discussion (FF: 1:14) Commissioner Jeff Barth said that the county and state should start the conversation now in case marijuana gets legalized in our state next year (which he thinks it will) when it comes to taxation, zoning, etc. He thought we were blindsided by Marsy’s Law and should be better prepared with marijuana legalization.

Bob Litz who happened to be standing at the podium talked about an upcoming speaker at a conference who is a sheriff from Colorado, who will speak about the effects of legalization in his state.

Of course, the commission’s Neo-Con, since Dick left, Cindy Heiberger had to weigh in. She said while David pointed out that NO one died from marijuana usage, she had to point out that it causes ‘social issues’.

I would partially agree, because people are tired of being arrested and prosecuted over a harmless drug, and the ‘issues’ it is causing in their lives.

UPDATE: Ellis probably should have ‘confirmed’ this before tweeting it

UPDATE: Ellis did apologize for his tweet yesterday, and in his defense, Hagen did have a brother die, even if it was a step brother.

If you’ve been following the Eric Hagen trial, you’ve noticed that J. Ellis has been tweeting for the Argus Leader. Did you catch the tweet yesterday that stated Eric Hagen’s brother might be dead?

That’s pretty sloppy journalism.  According to a foot soldier who knows the Hagen family what made it truly a living nightmare is that Eric Hagen is from this area.  His aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents were all alerted to that tweet and had several hours of crying and anguish before they could reach Eric’s only brother to confirm he was alive and ok.  He travels a lot and lives in L.A., so it was very plausible Eric’s brother could have died and his relatives not been notified yet. With Ellis being part of the press pool, he may have had access to alternative information. While he does say that it ‘needed to be confirmed’ it should not have been tweeted at all until he knew for sure.
I’m starting to wonder if anyone at the AL even gives a rip anymore.
Oh, and BTW, not only is Eric’s Brother still alive, Eric is a free man;

Eric Hagen was acquitted Wednesday by a jury in Flandreau that needed only a couple of hours to deliberate. Hagen and his company consulted with the Flandreau Santee Sioux in 2015 on the project.The tribe eventually torched its crop amid fears of a federal raid, and Hagen was charged with several counts related to marijuana possession.

Hagen says the state overstepped its authority in bringing the case. He says he “never once thought that I was guilty.”

Oh the irony of this case compared to when Fatty Patty Powwers was running his political trinket business out of the SOS’s office. Jackley tries to charge Hagen with possession of a product the tribe owned, because Jackboots knew he couldn’t go after the tribe. When Stan Adelstein accused Pat Powerless, as sitting deputy SOS, of ‘borrowing’ intellectual property from the state to help his personal political consulting business, Jackley finds Mr. Fish & Chips NOT GUILTY of stealing (money or other materials from the state). Something he wasn’t accused of to begin with.
And this guy wants to be governor. LMFAO.

Tribal official with interesting last name

The tribes can legally grow and sell marijuana;

The Oglala Sioux Tribal Council this year rejected a proposal to allow marijuana on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Law and Order Committee Chairwoman Ellen Fills the Pipe says marijuana is a drug, and her gut feeling is that the tribe won’t allow its cultivation.

Maybe next time Woster needs to interview an official with the last name ‘Kills the Pipe’ instead.

SD Medical Marijuana proponents plan Saturday Meeting

Should be interesting.

newsummitfeature

 

The House I Live in

The American Civil Liberties Union and South Dakota Families First have partnered to host an exclusive film tour of the award-winning documentary ‘The House I Live In’ and panel discussion with experts about incarceration and drug laws.

Event details:

When: Friday Jan. 4th
Meet & Greet 5:30pm
Movie 6pm
Panel Discussion 7:45pm
(Featuring Judge Mark Bennett from Sioux City, IA who appears in the film)

Where:
The downtown Holiday Inn City Centre 100 W. 8th St.
Falls Event Room on the main floor

– – About the Movie – –

As America remains embroiled in conflict overseas, a less visible war is taking place at home, costing countless lives, destroying families, and inflicting untold damage on future generations of Americans. Over forty years, the War on Drugs has accounted for more than 45 million arrests, made America the world’s largest jailer, and damaged poor communities at home and abroad. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever before. Filmed in more than twenty states, ‘The House I Live In’ captures heart-wrenching stories from individuals at all levels of America’s War on Drugs. From the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge, the film offers a penetrating look inside America’s longest war, offering a definitive portrait and revealing its profound human rights implications.

While recognizing the seriousness of drug abuse as a matter of public health, the film investigates the tragic errors and shortcomings that have meant it is more often treated as a matter for law enforcement, creating a vast machine that feeds largely on America’s poor, and especially on minority communities. Beyond simple misguided policy, ‘The House I Live In’ examines how political and economic corruption have fueled the war for forty years, despite persistent evidence of its moral, economic, and practical failures.

View the trailer and read more reviews at:
http://www.TheHouseILiveIn.org/

Learn more about the event sponsors at:
http://www.ACLUSD.org/
http://www.SDFamiliesFirst.org/

STAMP POT – POT STAMP

http://sodaknorml.org/2012stamp.htm

Still the carnage continues. For what?

Guest post by Bob Newland

With gratitude to South DaCola for the opportunity…

South Dakota law enforcement have arrested a person for possession of “marijuana” every 90 minutes since at least July 1, 1998. The total number of arrests is 82,402. The average number of possession arrests per year is equal to about .05% of the population of South Dakota.

Even though only 24,637 of the charges led to convictions, that’s still somebody convicted of possession every 5.5 hours. For 14 years. For what?

Even the 57,765 not convicted were punished. For what?

Cannabis is more available, better (in most folks’ minds), and cheaper (counting inflation) than it was 14 years ago. And more folks are using it. W? T? F?

Take a look at the numbers.
http://www.sodaknorml.org/2012leglttrs.html#Oct1

We don’t know how much it costs to arrest someone for possession or distribution. We don’t know how much is recovered in the form of fines and property forfeitures to offset that cost. If it costs more to arrest someone for doing something that doesn’t hurt someone else than we, as taxpayers, get back, we should stop doing it. If we, as taxpayers, make money arresting people for doing something that doesn’t hurt someone else, we should stop doing it.